Padre J Roulston

Judaism

11 posts in this topic

I have some questions I would like to ask a practitioner of Judaism about. 

 

If there is someone out there who would be willing to answer my questions I would be very much obliged. :)

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When you say "Holy Texts," I'm assuming that you are indicating texts which make up the nature of the Old Testament.

(Looked up the word "Reverenced for additional support.)

Conclusion:  In Judaism they are VERY stringent about genealogies and time-lines.  Usually, they account the writers of the texts as primary witnesses to the written account (and certainly no less than secondary witnesses - add stricter guidelines yet,) or editors of the main text.  For example, the Torah.  Moses did not write the book of Genesis, he was the editor.  The Creation account presumably written by God Himself and handed to Adam.  Adam's account, Seth's account, a few linear persons leading to Noah, the three sons and primary persons of the three major tribes which repopulated the earth - all first hand witnesses of the historical event.

This is what makes them highly 'revered.'  All accounts stem from God's interaction with man to the next event.

Hope this helps in some way.

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It answers some of the points I'm looking for... 

 

Ultimately what I'm trying to do is find the links between Judaism, and Christianity in where the importance of the holy texts changed. 

 

As I understood (and am looking for clarification on) was that the Torah (and other texts) are thought to be the Word of God. Because they are the Word of God they are then revered as holy, kept in the Tabernacle/Ark. And if dropped and touch the ground there are certain prayers and rituals that must be performed. Etc. 

 

What I'm trying to discern is when/why that opinion changed in Christianity. 

 

I understand that more importance is put on the Eucharist over the text. But why the change in belief/change in behaviour over the text. I have seen (and myself been guilty of at one point) people toss bibles on the floor, or just toss them around as though the bible were any book. Not treat it with any kind of reverence. 

 

My thoughts is that if an A student was the best in the class, and received all the praise from the teacher... then a new A+ student transfers in, becoming the new best student. The A student wouldn't be deserving of any less praise. 

If that makes sense. 

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Well, I think you would be best directed to the Mosaic Law or the Halakha .

The Old Testament laws and traditions were lifted in Christianity because it is already presumed that we abide lawfully through grace.

Remember the Ark of the Covenant when it was in possession by (one of Israel's enemies).  Spooky things were happening in their temples and they wanted King David to get the ark out of their country.  Well, the first priests he sent were killed by God because they were vain and caviler about doing it.  The only person that could do it was some (older) guy who knew the Mosaic Law.  He got there with his servants, went through the motions and they properly lifted the Ark.  Not more than several steps later, they sat the Ark down and gave thank and reverence to God - a lot (what's that word?) "Ob. . .-" oh well  -  a lot reverence going on every step of the way back to Israel!

I toss my Bible about from time to time - guilty as charged, but I certainly don't treat the contents of the Bible in the same manner, if you know what I mean.  And I think a lot to do with that is the availability of the Bible, today.  It's like how people treated their clothes and shoes a long time ago - you took care of these things because tailoring was very tedious and machined clothes unheard of.

. . .or something like that.

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It may not answer your questions directly however the best OT study I have read is here

 

http://www.torahclass.com/

 

You do have to register to use it however that is free and they do not bother you with junk emails. It is an incredibly long study but I have found it a pleasure to read. It puts much context into the OT.

 

http://www.torahclass.com/old-testament-studies  for the OT studies, I would recommend just starting from the beginning!!!

 

 

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movies are sometimes a bit biased, however the film "the believer" sorta summed it up when I knew nothing about Judaism. Top that a short note.. ..maybe i still dont.

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I read a book, The Torah for Dummies. It explained things nicely, and also a piece on how their Saturday services are conducted, and how the Torah is written - very interesting. They have to read from scrolls that have been written, not typed. There must be no mistakes in the Torah when compared with a printed copy, if a mistake is found, they put all 'discarded' scrolls in a room (called genizah) where all unusable religious texts are kept since they may not be thrown away. 

 

I'm not sure how the Torah and Talmud are treated in the homes of Jews. When needing to empty the genizah, I believe they have to bury the texts, preferably near a sacred spot such as a shul (synagogue). 

 

Muslims also have to treat the Quran with respect, and when discarding religious texts, they must be burnt and not buried. I like to treat all religious texts (regardless of religion) with equal respect.

 

If you would like to reach a mainly Muslim and Jewish Facebook community, there is a group called Abraham's Tent that welcomes questions that are aimed towards interfaith relations. You can try posting there too :) I think you will find responsive, helpful people there.

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Oh man this would be interesting! I've talked to many Christians and Muslims about their faith but Judaism is just not a big public force or movement in my part of the world.

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That's reality Snar, I've reached a number of Jewish people via Facebook (and know 2 in real life), and they are delightful, I find Islam and Judaism to be very close in terms of beliefs and religious practice, and I often wish that I was taught Judaism first, before Christianity (as my own religion) - although if I were Jewish I would not have become Christian. But it's not a religion you can just enter, it's a complicated matter, because you become a part of the Jewish Family, and it's not one you can easily leave. According to Judaism, from what I read in The Torah for Dummies, only 600,000 Jewish souls exist at any given time which corresponds to the 600,000 letters in the Torah. So there is a process of reincarnation. 

 

And I just looked up the conversion process, because it doesn't make sense that a gentile soul turns into Jewish soul upon conversion, since there can only be 600,000. I found this in my search: "The soul of the ger [similar to convert], our sages taught, stood at Mount Sinai. In at least one way, the ger is yet greater, for the ger is the lost child who has found his way home."

 

* "A ger literally means someone who has come to live among a people to which he or she was not born."

http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/3002/jewish/Why-Is-Conversion-to-Judaism-So-Hard.htm

 

I've always found the Jewish community a difficult one to find.

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